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darlingbenny:

bc this post speaks the truth

Why on Earth did you screenshot their tumblr post instead of just reblogging and commenting?

currentsinbiology:

Inside the cell, an ocean of buffeting waves
 A new biophysical study led by researchers at Harvard University reveals that the cytoplasm is actually an elastic gel, so it puts up some resistance to simple diffusion. But energetic processes elsewhere in the cell—in the cytoskeleton, especially—create random but powerful waves in the cytoplasm, pushing on proteins and organelles alike. Like flotsam and jetsam buffeted by the wakes of passing ships, suspended particles scatter much more quickly and widely than they would in a calm sea.
Because transport within the cytoplasm therefore depends mainly on separate processes that consume energy, a measurement of the spectrum of forces exerted on the cytoplasm at any given time can provide a snapshot of the metabolic state of the cell.
Led by David A. Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), a team of applied physicists and cell biologists have put forth this new model of the cytoplasm and demonstrated a way to quantify the aggregate forces felt by particles and organelles in the cell. Their findings, published online August 14 in the journal Cell, raise a host of new questions about cellular dynamics. They also provide a robust new tool for future investigations.

"Our research provides the first real physical understanding of the cytoplasm in mammalian cells," says lead author Ming Guo, Ph.D. ‘14, a former graduate student in applied physics at Harvard SEAS who is now continuing as a postdoctoral fellow to further explore the fundamental biophysics of cells. "This work is going to be critical for future research on development, cancer biology, and metabolism."

Caption: Within the cytoplasm, fluctuating forces enhance the intracellular transport of proteins and organelles. Credit: Image courtesy of Ming Guo, Harvard SEAS.

currentsinbiology:

Inside the cell, an ocean of buffeting waves

 A new biophysical study led by researchers at Harvard University reveals that the cytoplasm is actually an elastic gel, so it puts up some resistance to simple diffusion. But energetic processes elsewhere in the cell—in the cytoskeleton, especially—create random but powerful waves in the cytoplasm, pushing on proteins and organelles alike. Like flotsam and jetsam buffeted by the wakes of passing ships, suspended particles scatter much more quickly and widely than they would in a calm sea.

Because transport within the cytoplasm therefore depends mainly on separate processes that consume energy, a measurement of the spectrum of forces exerted on the cytoplasm at any given time can provide a snapshot of the metabolic state of the cell.

Led by David A. Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), a team of applied physicists and cell biologists have put forth this new model of the cytoplasm and demonstrated a way to quantify the aggregate forces felt by particles and organelles in the cell. Their findings, published online August 14 in the journal Cell, raise a host of new questions about cellular dynamics. They also provide a robust new tool for future investigations.

"Our research provides the first real physical understanding of the cytoplasm in mammalian cells," says lead author Ming Guo, Ph.D. ‘14, a former graduate student in applied physics at Harvard SEAS who is now continuing as a postdoctoral fellow to further explore the fundamental biophysics of cells. "This work is going to be critical for future research on development, cancer biology, and metabolism."

Caption: Within the cytoplasm, fluctuating forces enhance the intracellular transport of proteins and organelles. Credit: Image courtesy of Ming Guo, Harvard SEAS.

xhobbledehoyx:

yasboogie:

James C. LewisIcons Of The Bible

The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.

"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."

"I wish to exhibit a splash of color onto the biblical pages of history with my creative embellishments. By doing so I hope to open the minds and eyes of the ignorant and create open conversations of how we can learn to see the world through colorful lenses. After all, the Gospel of Jesus Christ is intended for everyone."

For those who’d like to see the entire collection, “Icons Of The Bible” will on display from November 2014 to February 2015 in Atlanta, GA.

-waits for white people to flip shit-

THIS IS FLIPPING AWESOME

sasstrid-and-dorkcup:

theonewiththeknees:

wolf-brat:

OH MY GOD I FOUND A FUCKING CLUE

FUCKING HELL YEAH BITCH IT’S CLUE HUNTING TIME

TIME TO PULL OUT THAT MOTHERFUCKIN NOTEBOOK HELL YES

sasstrid-and-dorkcup:

theonewiththeknees:

wolf-brat:

OH MY GOD I FOUND A FUCKING CLUE

FUCKING HELL YEAH BITCH IT’S CLUE HUNTING TIME

TIME TO PULL OUT THAT MOTHERFUCKIN NOTEBOOK HELL YES

HOLY SHIT A CLUE

(Source: squidward--testicles)

siminiblocker:

Pedestals.

siminiblocker:

Pedestals.

wuppes:

Artist : mark camps from arizona

Holy crap, that is AWESOME.

wuppes:

Artist : mark camps from arizona

Holy crap, that is AWESOME.

siminiblocker:

BFFs.

This is the actual cutest.

siminiblocker:

BFFs.

This is the actual cutest.

trevenants:

#iconic

I have been quoting this for years.

(Source: humanstefan)

saydolly:

Aziz Ansari is like the king of callouts.

Yeah, I would consider that one of the cooler superpowers.

(Source: renloras)

draumstafir:

rogerrrs:

i wanna go for walks in the middle of the night but i also dont want to die ya feel

just girly things

(Source: ruffaloh)