JavaJack

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(Source: sandandglass)

wwhatevver-ampora:

moewave:

ohh-tedbundy:

A true warrior.

I can’t believe he defeated Mr.Incredible

I love how he fuckin fuckin STOMPS on Fred Flintstone

WWWAAAAAHHHHHH

(Source: notienedesperdicio)

fandomsandfeminism:

returntothestars:

ianthe:

!!

dat practical armor

I love every aspect of this.

FINALLY

fandomsandfeminism:

returntothestars:

ianthe:

!!

dat practical armor

I love every aspect of this.

FINALLY

kazi-is-amazing:

Mr. Krabs displays his mastery of alchemy by transmuting eight Krabby Patties into a single pizza, such is the law of equivalent exchange.

kazi-is-amazing:

Mr. Krabs displays his mastery of alchemy by transmuting eight Krabby Patties into a single pizza, such is the law of equivalent exchange.

joanne-and-deans-bacon:

I’M SAVING THESE TO FUCK WITH PEOPLE’S BRAINS

These are beautiful <3

(Source: best-of-memes)

stoned-hands:

YEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSS

PUNKIN

http://kateordiecomics.com/archive/apple-spice-and-caramel-and-cinnamon/

PUNKIN

(Source: xylodemon)

elysiumcastiel:

michael-7123:

manearion:

ribstongrowback:

needs-more-pony:

mandopony:

fire-blast-pegasus:

ohsocialjustice:

A very good way of going about explaining this issue. It’s good to see something positive come from Tumblr.

REBLOG THE SHIT OUT OF THIS.

And the reblog button was hit so quickly that it actually was reblogged BEFORE it was clicked

Will always reblog this.

I just like being girly. But what I like more, is having people noticing without minding. Just the fact that they’re aware of what I am and want to be without seeing anything but god old little me makes me happy, and most importantly, comfortable.

I literally never, ever reblog these sort of posts, but this one is going up, since it’s pretty much one of the few who nails it all the way!

This is what feminism SHOULD be about. And it still is for a lot of people, but not enough of them on this site.

this is the topic of my ap english class right now and damn some faith in humanity is restored cause shit this isnt just girls conforming to social standards and being destroyed

This is the defining message of my existance

(Source: homo-club)

It’s been a while since I’ve been able to post. Time for that to change.

darlingbenny:

bc this post speaks the truth

Why on Earth did you screenshot their tumblr post instead of just reblogging and commenting?

currentsinbiology:

Inside the cell, an ocean of buffeting waves
 A new biophysical study led by researchers at Harvard University reveals that the cytoplasm is actually an elastic gel, so it puts up some resistance to simple diffusion. But energetic processes elsewhere in the cell—in the cytoskeleton, especially—create random but powerful waves in the cytoplasm, pushing on proteins and organelles alike. Like flotsam and jetsam buffeted by the wakes of passing ships, suspended particles scatter much more quickly and widely than they would in a calm sea.
Because transport within the cytoplasm therefore depends mainly on separate processes that consume energy, a measurement of the spectrum of forces exerted on the cytoplasm at any given time can provide a snapshot of the metabolic state of the cell.
Led by David A. Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), a team of applied physicists and cell biologists have put forth this new model of the cytoplasm and demonstrated a way to quantify the aggregate forces felt by particles and organelles in the cell. Their findings, published online August 14 in the journal Cell, raise a host of new questions about cellular dynamics. They also provide a robust new tool for future investigations.

"Our research provides the first real physical understanding of the cytoplasm in mammalian cells," says lead author Ming Guo, Ph.D. ‘14, a former graduate student in applied physics at Harvard SEAS who is now continuing as a postdoctoral fellow to further explore the fundamental biophysics of cells. "This work is going to be critical for future research on development, cancer biology, and metabolism."

Caption: Within the cytoplasm, fluctuating forces enhance the intracellular transport of proteins and organelles. Credit: Image courtesy of Ming Guo, Harvard SEAS.

currentsinbiology:

Inside the cell, an ocean of buffeting waves

 A new biophysical study led by researchers at Harvard University reveals that the cytoplasm is actually an elastic gel, so it puts up some resistance to simple diffusion. But energetic processes elsewhere in the cell—in the cytoskeleton, especially—create random but powerful waves in the cytoplasm, pushing on proteins and organelles alike. Like flotsam and jetsam buffeted by the wakes of passing ships, suspended particles scatter much more quickly and widely than they would in a calm sea.

Because transport within the cytoplasm therefore depends mainly on separate processes that consume energy, a measurement of the spectrum of forces exerted on the cytoplasm at any given time can provide a snapshot of the metabolic state of the cell.

Led by David A. Weitz, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), a team of applied physicists and cell biologists have put forth this new model of the cytoplasm and demonstrated a way to quantify the aggregate forces felt by particles and organelles in the cell. Their findings, published online August 14 in the journal Cell, raise a host of new questions about cellular dynamics. They also provide a robust new tool for future investigations.

"Our research provides the first real physical understanding of the cytoplasm in mammalian cells," says lead author Ming Guo, Ph.D. ‘14, a former graduate student in applied physics at Harvard SEAS who is now continuing as a postdoctoral fellow to further explore the fundamental biophysics of cells. "This work is going to be critical for future research on development, cancer biology, and metabolism."

Caption: Within the cytoplasm, fluctuating forces enhance the intracellular transport of proteins and organelles. Credit: Image courtesy of Ming Guo, Harvard SEAS.